SUSTAINABILITY, TRADITION, TECHNOLOGY AND BEAUTY AT FOODTURE 2021
EXPLORE IED BARCELONA
 

Project: Síntesi | Visual

Project: Síntesi

SUSTAINABILITY, TRADITION, TECHNOLOGY AND BEAUTY AT FOODTURE 2021

In 2019, 931 million tonnes of food was wasted, according to the United Nations report Food Waste Index 2021. The magnitude of the figure underlines the fact that we are facing a global emergency with major social, economic and environmental impacts.

The need for innovative solutions for the future of food and the planet is the central idea behind Foodture, a summit that will take place on 26 and 27 November at the Disseny Hub, which will feature three projects by IED Barcelona alumni.

The proposals, which will be exhibited in the space that the event has dedicated to emerging talent, revolve around aspects such as the circular economy, the search for sustainable alternatives to the excessive consumption of meat, and the recovery of social traditions around the table.

Against the backdrop of Barcelona being chosen as the 2021 World Sustainable Food Capital, Foodture has been conceived as a meeting place to explore and redesign the world of food.

Projects by IED Barcelona students

Guateámala, by Sofía Novales

A reflection on the ritual of coffee through the design of a ceramic coffee set that revisits Mayan craftsmanship from a contemporary perspective.

The colour of the pieces is inspired by traditional textiles from the area of Huehuetenango, a famous coffee-growing region in Guatemala.

Ntomo, by Francesco Maria Lucini

This project contrasts Western society’s rejection of the consumption of insects with a beautiful gastronomic experience that integrates them as an ingredient.

Ntomo is a set of edible dishes that aims to raise awareness about sustainability and excessive meat consumption.

Reddo, by Francesco Maria Lucini

Lucini is also present at Foodture with Reddo, a new material made from oyster shells.

With a focus on the circular economy, the proposal makes use of new digital production techniques to create underwater structures from natural waste in those reef areas most sensitive to the effects of climate change.